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, getting his gangnam on. our very own neil cavuto bringing his fiscal cliff news straight ahead. you're looking at gold, lots of it jumping into gold and silver% as a safe haven. actual bars of gold. help investors get in on the action. melissa: we have been talking about it on fox business, the next great government bailout. going to save the federal housing administration. time for stocks as with every 15 minutes, let's had before the new york stock exchange, nicole petallides standing by. down 13. nicole: this is one of those markets with a lot of anticipation. every focuses on the fiscal cliff. tomorrow is the all-important jobs report for a lot of folks have been hearing more economic news which has been more dismal lately. talk about more layoffs they have seen in november. right now the market is not too far off the unchanged line. the acidity holding 1400. the tech of the nasdaq still below 3000. today apple is now moving into the green and that is one of the reasons why it is holding on to a quarter percent gain. apple $700, 705 in september traded as low as 518 today. certa
one major stock clearing house was raising margin requirements. and then there's the fiscal cliff. analysts citing fears about a hike in capital gains tax in 2013. rick santelli has been talking about this, though, the things that were up in 2012, those are the things being sold now, whether that be gold or any number of assets that rose appreciably over the course of the last year. we'll be talking about the future of apple and the outlook for its stock a little later this morning with jonathan geller of the boy genius report. >> good old bump on the road on the way to a trillion dollar market cap. got to 600 pretty easily. and now it's back at 500. above 600 i guess. tough to get to a trillion dollar market cap. cisco got to 600 billion once, too. it's at 100 billion. apple still at 500. we talked about are they going to come out with the chartreuse slightly smaller mini ipad. and that's going to be the -- a lot of people waiting in line for that one. >> i do have to say, i'm in the market for a mini ipad. >> not for the max ipad? >> no, i want something smaller to carry around,
over the fiscal cliff if republicans don't give in on higher taxes for the wealthy. a little bit of trade data out of the uk. i didn't have a forecast for this. adjusted global goods trade deficit 9.5 billion. september unrevised. forecast here forecast at 8.65, so that is a wide deficit than forecast. adjusted 4.5 billion. sterling not reacting huge amount. european stocks today are firmer. up 0.4% for the ftse. xetra dax continues its strong momentum, we are trading at 52 week highs and up now about 27% for the year. bond markets which is where we stand with yields, spanish ten year yields slightly lower, but we were 5.2% beginning of the week was the handle. currency markets, not huge changes. euro-dollar just below 1.31, dollar-yen 82.44. euro trading, though, at a fresh day high it must be said. we have comments coming out of china on the smartphone segment. apple's rang in china smartphone market which will become the world's biggest this year down to number six in the third quarter. facing tougher competition from chinese brands. this is the research firm idc coming out wi
of kabuke theater. >> everyone got disgusted. nobody needs that image. >> the fiscal cliff will certainly be one of the main topics of discussion when president obama meets with some of the nation's governors today. actually i think they're meeting with vice president biden. then governors will be meeting with some of the congressional leadership, as well. but you guys are watching this, we know this is drama and theater. do you think a deal gets struck at the end of the day? >> i do. i have to say, i still think we'll get a last minute deal. i just cannot imagine that congress will allow to us go over the cliff. so i think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hope
, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i think so. julian, we're going to leave because we have to get a break in and we've got to g to egypt as
talking about every morning here since the election. fiscal cliff, big, big issue. there are now, it seems, growing numbers of people on both the right and the left who would like to see us just go over that fiscal cliff. how big of a problem would that be? >> that would be a big problem. i actually still believe that those -- the democrats, the administration, republicans in the final analysis don't want to see that happen. they do understand that not only would that present a problem in the near term as we went over the cliff at the end of the year, but we still then have the whole debt ceiling fight that would transpire shortly into the new year. the issue isn't simply the negative result of going over the cliff, but it's also that business, consumers, everybody continues to hold back on the uncertainty. and we believe the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the preside
it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is monday. but not for any earnings. not for any releases. that's when we process the results of the weekend talk shows, which you now have to watch as if we were instead of watching, you know, colleg
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
a moment. we do want to begin with the markets and that looming fiscal cliff. the dow finishing november lower for the second consecutive month. the blue chips falling half a percent in november. and #% sinnasdaq and s&p did fi higher last month. six out of ten sectors managed to post a gain. consumer discretionary stocks up the most. utilities the biggest losers. and while individual trading sessions may have been choppy, it was another month of low volatility. the vix remained below 20 for the fourth consecutive month and that's the longest streak since february of 2007. a big part of the market story has obviously been a big topic dominating the sunday talk shows. tim geithner arguing republicans need make the next move in negotiations. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms or they would like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what they would like as an alternative. build on those, tell us how. but we can't react to anything until we see the details of the proposal and we need it on the rates and revenue side as well as on the spending side.
. for the top 1%. i just don't see any changes from the fiscal cliff that is coming up. guest: i think there are big changes coming up. i think the president has drawn a line in the sand and let republicans know he has no intention of allowing the tax rates for the wealthiest americans to be extended again. they were extended in 2010, but i feel there is a new resolve on the part of the white house to not let that happen again. i'm not sure if all the rates will be increased as much as the president would like. it could be that they get bumped up by a point or two, instead of the 45 that he wants to increase them by. -- four or five that he wants to increase them by. if nothing changes, then tax rates go up for everybody, which would be a very big change, but i do not think that is going to happen. host: here is a tweet. christian churches are not the only ones affected by deductions. holiday donations, how is that factoring into the fiscal cliff? is there anything going on that's give them more of an argument? are they coming to washington like everyone else to have their point of vie
here are worried about the fiscal cliff and the potential impact that it could have on american consumers as well as the factories here. eunice yun, cnbc, beijing. >> are those fears right, is the the expansion just investment-led and therefore not worth as much and that seems to be the insinuation? >> also i think china and china manufacturing has always historically been investment led anyway. much less consumer dependent than what we see maybe in europe and the u.s. but, yes, that meeting is just back into expansion territory. that's good in itself. global growth will be looking for china to be going ahead. so good but modest. so any demand elsewhere could have an impact on china. >> have we had the china slowdown? >> we've had mosts of it i think. but again, china is very much in recent line with the cycle of the global economy and we'll be looking for some of the big growth engines to help them, as well. >> what's the chinese swing factor for investors? >> sitting in europe clearly it's something we focus upon. is it a driving force, absolutely not. the tail risk i think is
different direction from the fiscal cliff and talk more about long-term and medium-term economic realities we face. in your written testimony to this committee, you warned against kicking the can down the road indefinitely because of the adverse effect that might have on the economy. the medium and long-term impact it might have. i thought your analysis was definitely something we need to pay attention to. as you observed in the failure to make progress in this area now could signal that we have bigger troubles ahead. the moody's analytics model that you used breaks down about 2028. the reason it does that because at that point, the interest on our national debt will start to cripple our economy. we will be left without much recourse. i'm not sure there is a tax increase on the planet that could suddenly fix that. i'm not sure we could print money fast enough. if we did, we would go the way of argentina. i tend to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where it is. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanc
-called fiscal cliff. >> this weekend on c-span3's "american history tv," follow harry truman's eldest son, as they prepared to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb on 1945. >> i know everyone has their own view. i don't want to argue survival. i think we're past that. i want to do what i can to see that this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we'r
of congress plus it puts the fiscal cliff and place right now and you lay it out i'm sorry, count me out. stacte want to take the first question? >> you raise a good point. this is where people's eyes glaze over. they can say whatever you want them to say. but the notion, i do think that there's been to the relationship between revenues and the titles and if we want to go bigger the better we need to push all of those, the smaller unit and the less you do on the other side, but there are some who say the idea of the american public is going to buy into this notion okay we are going to look devotees taxes go up so everything can be returned in a tax cut, and we go through this magical power. they are going to think 90% of the approval. so, you're going to have a general consensus. you do this year to get 500 of that in the interest savings alone. this should not be as challenging as it is. >> the other thing i would disagree about is the fact and i have been a huge jet kit and continue to be a huge advocate of tax reform debate and it's a critically important piece and i do think the noti
move closer and closer to the fiscal cliff everyone will be keeping an eye out on a big deal or could we see a big tax hike. only three weeks before we possibly go over. david: wonder if we trade the guns to avoid a deal for the fiscal cliff. lauren: you're onto something. david: maybe. i don't think they would go for that. "money" with melissa francis is coming next. melissa: i'm melissa francis. here is what is money tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for exports and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing in the way though is president obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags on the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe
the fiscal cliff and about further risks from eurozone financial crisis? go . >> we know the markets are driven on a minute by minute basis, but if we just step back from that, the chances that in two to three months from now, obviously we could briefly go over in january, i think that's unlikely, the chance that we'll really have the u.s. economy squeeze by 4%, 5% of gdp, i think it's incredibly unlikely. >> what are you assuming about the ongoing eurozone -- >> the eurozone, if we go through a series of ticks, we have had a lot of progress this year. you have to be clear about that. and not just with all the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused o
the country goes over the fiscal cliff goes by, more and more republicans have joined our chorus. they recognize that the willing misto compromise sooner has put them in a real bind. so reasonable republicans are asking the house leadership to allow a vote on the senate-passed legislation. what was once a trickle has become more of a flood. last week republican representative tom cole said it was time to give middle-class families certainty their taxes won't go up by $2,200 on average on january 1. then tim scott from north carolina ad admitted that the senate-passed tax cut will surely pass the house since it will take only 26 republican ren votes for passage. i don't most of the time agree with david brooks but no one can dispute this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on
up to the scal cliff. december consumer sentiment nosedid to a five-year high, because of fiscal cliff fears. a spike in taxes would leave a lot less money lying aroundor the iphone or ipad. shares of apple fell 2%. >>> thanks to a study by the department of energy the u.s. may be closer to approve natural gas exports. data shows it could improve th economy by $47 billion in 2020. we need that. sounds like a win-win. we have the ceo of bright link oil and gas. chris, thanks for joining us. >> thank you. melissa: what do you make of this report? first of all, do you buy it? do you think it's possible? >> i dohink it's psible and i'm glad to see it come out. what it really does now it shows overhe 12 different enarios that the government study investiged each one of those scenarios came back and said america will benefit and have a positive economic gai if we export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our head
in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal.
things done. not limited to just worry about the debt and fiscal cliff and such. our program today just loosely, i'm welcoming you, obviously, joan walker's going the talk, ed reilly of sgi is going the give the polling results, and then ron brownstein of national journal is going to do our interview, and then we're going to have a panel discussion. so it's going to be a full and absolutely terrific day, i think. please, turn these babies off. and, again, welcome you. let me introduce joan walker. joan is executive vice president of allstate which is one of the country's largest insurance, we're in good hands with allstate, we all grew up with that. joan has been a terrific partner, in the last four years she's responsible for all corporate relations with allstate. prior to joining that company in 2005, she did similar work with monsanto and qwest. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist which, of course, in this town of washington is really all about. so, joan, thank you very much, and we want to welcome our friends here. [applause] >> good morning, and thank you so
about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act in laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 elections. >> why a writers institute? >> i think it is something that is very important. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are a key to our imagination, our capacity to imagine things. we are not completely tied to print on the page. there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps soma, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that captures the human. . the >> joint american history television and c-span local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes of a letter lives of new york city. >> next you hear from bradley manning's attorney about his case. he is accused of leaking classified documents to the web site wikileaks. the trial is under way in maryland. he testified earlier on the conditions he has experienced since being detained in iraq. this is half an hour. >> i really appreciate the turn out here, especially the turn of by the press. thank you for that. i have not participated in any public event for today. i also avoid any interviews with th
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
of why we are here, none of you who claim to be here. we are here debating a fiscal cliff. we're here debating direction of america, we were going to go financially. very responsible ability as members of congress. we are the stewards of public funding. it's rightfully have this hearing again and i vitiated. in december when i came, at least a couple issues. we want to invest in infrastructure. one america to move quickly in the best ways possible. what you want from you also need a plan for her. if the networks, a planned test it, it's an audited in a plan that has a review. i happen to come from california. the happiness in the area and many of you talk about. it's part of where it began. i have ruled out of viability, cost and with them and come in this will ever that is why i joined the chairman, mr. denham, mr. miller at the gao, asking for an audit and review of the business plan in california. a look forward to hearing testimony later through corporatists completed. today it has been billions of dollars. as concerns about the business plan itself an equally concerning to me jus
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)